• Getting Started

     

    This toolkit is designed for running online psychology tests. These tests present multimedia stimuli (e.g., sounds, videos, words, colours) and might be particularly useful for those interested in sensory, multisensory, or synaesthesia research.

    In a nutshell the toolkit works like this: decide which researchers you want to share your tests with and form a GROUP. Then decide what TESTS you want to run and create those tests (i.e., experiments). Then decide what type of information sheets and ethical consent sheets you want to accompany your tests and create these as FORMS. Finally, link one or more tests together to form a STUDY (i.e., a group of experiments).

    Please click on the topics to the right to get help for specific items.

  • Studies

     

    A STUDY is a collection of smaller modules which are either FORMS (e.g., a consent page) or TESTS. You create a STUDY after you have already created your FORMS and TESTS. The STUDY puts them together in whatever order you like.  The setup of a STUDY also allows you to specify the conditions under which different participants will take part in different tests, this includes factors such as counter-balancing and conditional logic.  For instance, you can set a TEST to only appear after a given result in a previous FORM. For example, you can create a FORM that asks whether the participant believes she is a genius (yes/no). Then you can create a behavioural TEST for intelligence. Then you can put both together in a study where you can also specify that subjects take the TEST only if they said yes in the FORM. Finally, you can start the entire STUDY with another FORM which gives instructions, and end it with a final FORM which gives the debfief. This study would present FORM FORM TEST FORM (if the subject said yes), or FORM FORM FORM (if the subject said no). In other words, subjects read the instructions, then answer a question about being a genius. If they say yes they take a test followed by the debrief. If they say no, they go straight to the debrief.


    Getting Started

    In this example I want to create a test for grapheme-colour synaesthesia. (1% of the population experience automatic colour associations for letters and numbers, and this is called grapheme-colour (GC) synaesthesia; we test for it by asking people if they have coloured letters or numbers, and if they say 'yes', we give them an objective test in which they see letters and numbers and have to choose their colours from a colour-palette).

     

    Before you start a STUDY, you need to have used the other buttons to create one or more TESTS or FORMS.  If you don't already have a TEST or a FORM, you have nothing to create a study with!  For this example, I have previously created a FORM with a single yes/no radio box answer. I have named this FORM 'GC Question'. I have also previously created a TEST for grapheme colour synesthesia, and I have named this TEST 'My Grapheme Colour Test'.

    Example form:

     

    Example Test:

    The aim of this tutorial is to create a simple STUDY that begins with the FORM, and then if the answer to the FORM is 'yes' then the participant does the TEST, and then at the end, redirects to a debrief informaton page about synesthesia.

    1. Click on STUDIES in the Toolkit menu to see a list of studies.  If you haven't created one before you may not see any (unless someone else has created one and shared it with you)! 

    2. Click the 'Create Study' button to create a new STUDY.

    3.Give the STUDY a title and name.  The title is used to identify the STUDY later when you or others need to access the results or to edit it.  The name must be unique to this STUDY, and will form part of the URL (ie. the testing link) you send to participants.  You can also choose to share this study with a GROUP.  Anyone in the GROUP will then be able to copy the STUDY or access the results. And anyone with elevated priviliges within the GROUP will be able to collaborate and edit it.  You can also give the study a colour - this is optional but can sometimes be useful when you have multiple studies or a simlar type.

    4. Now you can start building the STUDY.  The first step is to add all the elements you need, specifically, the FORM and the TEST.  To do this click the 'Add new element' button, then click 'Test' then click on the TEST you created.  Next do the same, but click 'Form' and click the FORM you created.

    5. You should now see your FORM and TEST appear in the Study Setup.  At the moment, if you ran the study, participants would first do the Test, and then the form.

    6.  You can change the order of the tests and forms by dragging them by their little icon (the test-tube for the TEST, the clipboard for the FORM).  You can also edit the TEST/FORM by clicking on the name, but for now do neither of these things.

    7.  Instead, we want to create some logic to show the TEST only when the participant answers yes to the question in the FORM.  To do this we need to add a branch, by clicking 'Add new element' and then 'Branch'.  This will result in an empty branch appearing at the bottom of the study setup.  

    8. Next we need to put the TEST inside the branch.  To do this double-click the test-tube icon of the test to put the item in move-mode.  When in move mode, the potential destinations for the element appear with dotted line borders (see below:).

    9.  Click inside the branch element to move the test inside the branch, which should produce the following setup:

  • Tests

     

    A Test is the basic element of the toolkit, and there are many different types for different needs.

  • Forms

     

    Forms allow you to create instruction pages, debrief pages and questionnaires with an easy editor. When you add a form to a study, the results of the form will be stored when participants take the study.  The form can contain all kinds of input such as text boxes, checkboxes, radio buttons, dates, numbers, sliders etc.  The form itself is in fact simply an HTML form, and if you know HTML you can edit the source directly and design any form you like.  Otherwise you can use the editor to create the form and insert form elements.  Please click a link below to scroll to the relevent section.

          Getting Started
          Examples of Form Elements
            Text box
            Text area
            Number
            Email
            
    Date
            Checkbox (e.g. Consent)
            Dropdown
            Slider
            Likert Scale
            Radio buttons
            Checkbox Array
            Likert Block

     


     

    Getting Started

    This section will take you on a small tutorial for getting a simple form up and running.  I recommend opening this page in another window and working alongside the form building page, to allow for easy cross reference.

    1. Click on 'Forms' in the Toolkit menu to get to the list of forms - at the start you will not see any forms as you have not created any!

    2. Click the 'Create Form' button to create a new form.

    3. Give the form a title and name.  The title is used to identify the form later when you incorporate it into your studies.  The name must be unique to this form.  You can also choose to share this form with a Group.  Anyone in the Group will then be able to copy and use the form in their own studies, and anyone with elevated privilidges within the group will be able to collaborate and edit it.

    4. Use the editor to insert text, pictures and form inputs (e.g. text boxes, likert scales).  To add form elements click the input drop down menu and select which type you want.

    5. It can often be a case of trial and error in figuring out the best way to arrange elements on a form - you can use tables to lay things out and line then up.  See the Examples section below for common examples of form elements.  In this example, I will simply create a name box and a check-box.  First off, click Input -> Text / Number / Date, then enter the information in the dialog.  The label is what the participant sees, but most importantly the Field ID is what governs how the result is shown in the data-file.  Make sure you set this to something short that will work in the datafile that the form outputs.  I've also created a checkbox with the Field ID 'likes-butter'.

    Text Field for name:

    Checkbox for liking butter:

    6. This produces a simple form which gathers the participants name and whether they like butter.  Note: You can double click on form items, to edit them.  You could add some text before and after to give the form some more context, but for now this will do.  Now we want to add an measure of how much the participant likes butter, if they do like butter.  To do that, we will add a slider, and then later, make it conditional on whether the participant has clicked on the 'I like butter' button.  First click Input -> Slider and create the slider underneath the other two form elements.

    Your form should now look somewhat like this:

    7. Since we only want the slider to appear when the participant actually likes butter, we will make it conditional on whether the participant has clicked 'I like butter'.  To do this select the slider and text, then click Condition -> Create.  This will highlight the conditonal area with a light background colour (will be different to example).

    Selecting slider and label, creating condional area:

    The final conditional area:

    8. Finally in the condition area, set the Form ID to likes-butter, to match the checkbox above, and set the value to 1 (1 means on for checkboxes):

    9. Now we can save and test the form.  First, click 'Store' at the bottom of the whole page.  This will take you back to the forms page, now you will see your form.  Click on the name of the form to expand its options, and click 'Practice':

    10. Check the form is working, and congratulations you have created your first working form!  To gather data, you need to insert it into a study, to learn how to do that, go to the Study section in the help pages.  Note: When you want to edit the form, click on the little blue pencil in the top right corner of the form's entry in the forms page (see above picture).  

    The final form in action:


     

    Examples of Form Elements

    Below here are some examples of the simple controls you can make with the form builder.  It's important to remember, if there is something you cannot achieve using the controls below, you can infact use HTML and CSS styling to make your form in anyway you can concieve.  Simply paste any HTML you want to use into the source code box, making sure that the form elements have name attributes (the names determine the column headers when the data is stored) - this advanced approach requires knowledge of HTML however, so should not be attempted unless you are confident.

    Text box

    Menu path:

    Input -> Text / Number / Date

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    Ticking the required box will make the participant unable to proceed without entering something into this box.  The length box governs how many characters can fit inside the field (and how big it is).

     

     Text area

    Menu path:

    Input -> Text / Number / Date

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    Ticking the required box will make the participant unable to proceed without entering something into this box.  For text areas, the length box just governs how wide the field is. 

     

    Number

    Menu path:

    Input -> Text / Number / Date

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    Ticking the required box will make the participant unable to proceed without entering something into this box.  The length box governs how many characters can fit inside the field (and how big it is).  The box will only accept numbers.

     

    Email

    Menu path:

    Input -> Text / Number / Date

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    Ticking the required box will make the participant unable to proceed without entering something into this box.  The length box governs how many characters can fit inside the field (and how big it is).  The box will only accept email addresses.

     

    Date

    Menu path:

    Input -> Text / Number / Date

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    Displays a date picker.  Ticking the required box will make the participant unable to proceed without entering something into this box.  The length box does nothing for this control.

     

    Checkbox (e.g. consent)

    Menu path:

    Input -> Checkbox

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    Ticking the required box will make the participant unable to proceed without checking the box, which is appropriate for consent forms.  For conditional logic, when the checkbox is ticked, it equals 1.

     

    Dropdown

    Menu path:

    Input -> Dropdown

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    Ticking the required box will make the participant unable to proceed without selecting something.  Each option appears on a seperate line (note that the values in the datafile will be transformed to lowercase, which is also the case when using conditional logic).

     

    Slider

    Menu path:

    Input -> Slider

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    The slider can be orientated horizontally or vertically.  Max and min govern the range of the number outputed by the slider, and step governs the minimum change in the slider. 

     

    Likert Scale

    Menu path:

    Input -> Likert / Radio / Checkbox

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    Ticking the required box will make the participant unable to proceed without answering this question.  Likert scales are typically orientated horizontally.  Place each option on a seperate line (note that the values in the datafile will be transformed to lowercase, which is also the case when using conditional logic).

     

    Radio Buttons

    Menu path:

    Input -> Likert / Radio / Checkbox

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    Ticking the required box will make the participant unable to proceed without answering this question.  Radio button arrays are typically orientated vertically.  Place each option on a seperate line (note that the values in the datafile will be transformed to lowercase, which is also the case when using conditional logic).

     

    Checkbox Array

    Menu path:

    Input -> Likert / Radio / Checkbox

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    Ticking the required box will make the participant unable to proceed without checking at least one item.  Checkbox arrays can be orientated vertically or horizontally.  Place each option on a seperate line (note that the values in the datafile will be transformed to lowercase and seperated with a comma, which is also the case when using conditional logic).

     

    Likert Block 

    Menu path:

    Input -> Likert Block

    Example:

    Preview:

    Notes:

    Ticking the required box will make the participant unable to proceed without answering each question.  For the question options, place each option on a seperate line (note that the values in the datafile will be transformed to lowercase, which is also the case when using conditional logic).  The questions will appear as rows.

  • Results

     

    You can find the results of your study, by going to the 'Studies' page, clicking on your study and then clicking 'Results'. Here you can download two types of results a) By-subject results and b) By-item results.

    By-subject results

    By-subject results represent the data with each participant on a separate row. Data is included here that varies on a participant to participant basis (i.e. not on a trial to trial basis). This would include answers to form questions, and overall scores for various tests. Please note that the “Session ID” is NOT a participant number, and it is not expected to be consecutive. It is the toolkit assigning a tag to individual users from your study (and also from others), and is linekd to the individual users data. For instance, if you want to delete a particpants data, you can do so by noting the Session ID.

    By-item results

    By-item results represent the data with each test-item (i.e. trial) on a separate row. The data here is for tests that have multiple presentations of stimuli, e.g. responses for each letter of the alphabet.

  • Help for groups